Bring your lunch and learn about water resource issues and research in Washington State. The Water Research Center is hosting a virtual lunchtime seminar series this spring. We’ll hear from the Center’s 2022-23 seed grant recipients and learn how their research is informing some of Washington State’s water-related challenges.

Please note, a Zoom account is required to login on the day of the event.  If you are having difficulty registering, please try entering an email address associated with a Zoom account.  Please email cindy.fabbri@wsu.edu if you require registration assistance.  We look forward to seeing you!

Upcoming Webinars:
Thursday, April 18, 2024, 12:00-1:00
Integrating Agricultural Water Use into Climate Change Impact Assessments

Kirti Rajagopalan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor

Dr. Rajagopalan and her research team worked to advance the climate change impacts assessment model, CropSyst, by integrating agricultural water use associated with managing extreme weather events (e.g., watering to control sunburn in apples) into modeling. Dr. Rajagopalan will explain the team’s efforts and how the new assessment capabilities can help regional water resources planning considerations.

Learn more and register here

Past Webinars:
Thursday, February 22, 2024, 12:00-1:00
Building Tribal-Academic Partnerships to Protect Pacific Salmon from Toxic Urban Stormwater

Stephanie Blair, Ph.D. Candidate

Stephanie Blair and her Advisor, Dr. Jenifer McIntyre, have been investigating the toxicity of urban stormwater, particularly the tire chemical 6PPD-Quinone, to Pacific Salmon. Stephanie will discuss how this chemical affects Coho and Chinook salmon. She will also touch on her collaborative work on the issue.

Learn more here

See the recording here

 

Thursday, March 21, 2024, 12:00-1:00
Using Drone-Based Technologies to Map Stream Characteristics and Salmon Spawning Habitat

Alex Fremier, Ph.D., Associate Professor

Dr. Fremier and Co-PI Daniel Auerbach developed drone-based technologies to measure stream velocity, temperature, and morphology. These measurements help identify and quantify salmon spawning habitat and offer new methodologies for environmental monitoring. Dr. Fremier will share the details of their study and work with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife in the Wenatchee River.

Learn more here