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“‘Smart’ water markets for agriculture: Innovation on the High Plains, and prospects for Washington State” Seminar

WRC and CEREO are pleased to sponsor a seminar by Nick Brozovic and Richael Young

Wednesday, 16, December 2015
Lighty 405, 12:00pm
WSU Pullman

Nicholas Brozovic is an economist with extensive experience in water policy and management worldwide. His research focuses on using economic analysis to evaluate and design management policies for spatial, dynamic natural resource systems. Much of his work is interdisciplinary and involves collaborations with engineers, urban planners and others. He is currently working to establish functioning resource markets, such as groundwater markets, that can be used as research and teaching platforms and as models of sustainability for industry. Brozovic joined the Water for Food Institute at the University of Nebraska in July 2014. In addition to teaching, he works to ensure that the Water for Food Institute’s scientific and policy research effectively informs both policy and decision makers. Previously, Brozovic was an associate professor of agriculture and consumer economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Brozovoc holds doctoral and master’s degrees in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California-Berkley, a master’s degree in geology from the University of Southern California and a bachelor’s degree in geology from Oxford University.

Richael Young specializes in market design for the exchange of natural resource rights. As an economist, engineer, and entrepreneur, she brings together complementary skillsets for natural resources management and policy. She strives to create tailored solutions that meet local needs and economic goals. In 2014, Richael cofounded Mammoth Trading, where she serves as president. In this capacity, Richael led the development and implementation of the first smart market for groundwater in the world. Mammoth Trading’s smart markets help producers put limited water to its most productive uses, all while meeting stream flow and regulatory obligations. Richael holds a B.S. in civil and environmental engineering and an M.S. in agricultural and applied economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

2016 Annual Student Water Conference on March 24-25, 2016

About the Conference: The conference will consist entirely of student presentations to be judged by a panel of faculty members for providing constructive feedback to students in regard to their research presentation skills. Student activities will promote interaction among students of all disciplines. The conference includes two major lectures: the annual Buchanan Lecture and a Career Perceptions Lecture.

Oral Presentation Guidelines: Oral presentations will be made with PowerPoint. We will have a computer and projector for you to use. You can either bring your presentation on a flash drive or e-mail to garey.fox@okstate.edu before the conference. Please ensure that your presentation is approximately 15 minutes, which will leave 2-3 minutes for questions.

Cafe-Style Poster Presentation Guidelines: We will provide easels and poster boards (3 ft by 4 ft) for mounting your posters. You will be required to print your own posters and bring them to the conference. At the start of the session, poster presenters will give a brief, overview (maximum of 2 minutes) of their poster to the audience.

Awards will be given for outstanding student poster and oral presentations.

Abstract Submission: Apply to present at this conference by completing the abstract submission form (linked here) by January 15, 2016.

Airport Shuttle: A shuttle will be provided between the Oklahoma City Airport (Will Rogers World Airport) and Stillwater on Wednesday, March 23rd and Saturday, March 27th.
For more information about the Student Water Conference, please contact Dr. Garey Fox (garey.fox@okstate.edu).

More Information

“The Essential Element” – Science After Hours

A Science After Hours program hosted by the Palouse-Clearwater Environmental Institute.

A goal of Science After Hours is for scientists and researchers to share their research with the community!
Three students from the NSF IGERT NSPIRE (Isaac Madsen, Jacqueline Burgher, and Julian Reyes) program at Washington State University will be presenting

The event will be held at the Camas Prairie Winery in Moscow, ID on Thursday, Nov 5th from 7-8pm.
(For more information).

Can Low Impact Development Fix the Urban Stream Syndrome?

ANAND JAYAKARAN, PH.D., PE
Associate Professor and LID Specialist

The talk will focus on the transformation of hydrologic processes associated with land use change, and how engineering using ecosystem-centric principles could lead to the better management of surface runoff in urbanizing watersheds. Ani will outline some of his work and those done by colleagues at three spatial scales, as well as relating past efforts to current work that promote the use of Low Impact Development techniques in the state of Washington.

Date: Monday, November 2, 2015
Place: Sloan 175
Time: 4:10 p.m.—5:00 p.m.

For more information

“What’s the Dam Problem?: A Panel Discussion on the Future of the Four Lower Snake River Dams”

Thursday, November 5th, University of Idaho is hosting a panel discussion consisting of:

(1) David Doeringsfeld, the Lewiston Port Manager
(2) Linwood Laughy, a local Citizen activist, author and historian
(3) John McKern, a Retired U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Fish and Wildlife Biologist
(4) Patrick Wilson, a Professor of Natural Resources at the University of Idaho
(5) Todd Myers, the Environmental Director of The Washington Policy Center
(6) Rebecca Miles, the Executive Director of the Nez Perce Tribe

The discussion will be moderated by Professor of Law & Coordinator of the Natural Resources and Environmental Law Program, Barbara Cosens.

When: Thursday November 5, 2015 at the
Where: University of Idaho College of Law, Courtroom
Meet and greet with refreshments: from 5 to 5:30 p.m.
Panel discussion: from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m.
more info

Jenny Adam: Model Conditions

 

 

 Jenny Adam, model conditions
 
 For more than 75 years, Washington State University researchers have created models for hydroelectric power plants along the Pacific Northwest’s Columbia River and around the world
Today, WSU researchers like Jennifer Adam are developing advanced computer models to assess how future economic and environmental conditions will affect water supply, hydropower generation, and agricultural productivity in the Columbia River Basin. Their forecast will provide policy leaders with the critical information needed to make better decisions about where and how to fund water supply projects in the future.
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 125 years, and counting. Learn more about Jennifer Adam’s research.

WSU 125 | est. 1890 Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

Dr. Tim Scheibe

“A hybrid multiscale framework for subsurface flow and reactive transport simulations”

Dr. Tim Scheibe, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Date: Monday, October 12, 2015
Place: Sloan 175
Time: 4:10 p.m.—5:00 p.m.
 Flyer

Call for Special Sessions

Universities Council on Water Resources (UCOWR) and
National Institutes of Water Resources (NIWR) Annual Water Resources Conference

June 21-23, 2016 Pensacola Beach, FL

We will be on the beautiful white sands of the Gulf Coast for the 2016 UCOWR/NIWR Annual Water Resources Conference. We will be discussing critical water issues in the southeastern United States, as well as across the continent and globe. Water quantity and quality concerns continue to take center stage in the United States and world. Please join the dialogue, as we seek to develop multi-disciplinary solutions to complex water problems. More details

Important dates:
Proposals for Special Sessions due: October 19, 2015
Notification of Special Sessions acceptance: October 26, 2015
Abstracts due: January 19, 2016
Notification of Abstract acceptance: Late March 2016

2016 UCOWR/NIWR Annual Water Resources Conference

SPR Talks: Our Water, Our Future

This year’s drought conditions have seriously impacted more than recreational life in the Inland Northwest. Tourist dollars are down in communities that rely on those recreational visits. Crop damage and dry pastures are harsh realities for agriculture. Smoke from various wildfires keeps those with asthma indoors. And many climate specialists believe this is only the beginning of our water-related problems. Read More

Falling a drop of water
Falling a drop of water

Call for Submissions to JCWRE

Journal of Contemporary Water Research and Education is now accepting general manuscript submissions for the yearly summer issue, beginning in 2016.

A journal issue comprised of general water-related submissions will be published yearly in the JCWRE summer issue. Submissions for the August 2016 issue should be sent to Jackie Crim (crimjac@siu.edu ) by February 1, 2016. All articles are peer-reviewed. Please review the author instructions and review process for more information on publishing in JCWRE.

OVERVIEW:

WHO:    You, your graduate students, your undergraduate researchers, your colleagues

WHAT:  Submit a water-related manuscript to the first open call issue of the Journal of Contemporary Water Research and Education (JCWRE).

WHEN:  Manuscripts due Feb. 1, 2016.  Issue slated to be published in August 2016.

WHERE:  Send a note of intent to submit a manuscript to crimjac@siu.edu before or by December 1, 2015.

Call for Submissions to JCWRE

Current Issue: Water Diplomacy (155)