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EXPLAINING THE INTRICACIES OF SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AT DIFFERENT SCALES WITH COMPUTATIONAL AND THEORETICAL APPROACHES

Seminar by Dr. Fabian A. Bombardelli

Date: Mon., April 25, 2016
Place: PACCAR 202
Time: 10:10 a.m.—11:00 a.m.

EXPLAINING THE INTRICACIES OF SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AT DIFFERENT SCALES WITH COMPUTATIONAL AND THEORETICAL APPROACHES
Examples of multi-phase flows are diverse: dust storms, sediment transport in rivers and estuaries, bubble plumes, and many other natural and man-made applications. To study sediment transport, the field is transitioning from old regressions of last 70 years, to mechanistic models, which combine deterministic and stochastic approaches. For reasons which are unclear, and despite the leadership of civil engineers in the field of sediment transport, the theory of two-phase flows has been developed elsewhere. These models address the interaction of carrier and disperse phases.
Still, it is not clear what to use for a given level of concentration, and for the objective of a given study. Furthermore, the action of turbulence needs to be quantified carefully depending on the problem at hand, and phenomena such as sediment entrainment need to be accounted for.
In this presentation, I describe a novel framework to analyze sediment transport, which clearly puts forward a pathway for the analysis of a host of problems. We present the application of this framework to solve the problem of sediment in suspension. For the case of transport of sediment as bed-load, we present a Lagrangian model which tracks each particle individually and addresses the Non-Fickian behavior of the particles; followed by a new computational algorithm for the Basset force. Finally, we describe theoretical and numerical approaches to deal with two-phase flows. The presentation concludes with an analysis of future work and the challenges to overcome

Examples of multi-phase flows are diverse: dust storms, sediment transport in rivers and estuaries, bubble plumes, and many other natural and man-made applications. To study sediment transport, the field is transitioning from old regressions of last 70 years, to mechanistic models, which combine deterministic and stochastic approaches. For reasons which are unclear, and despite the leadership of civil engineers in the field of sediment transport, the theory of two-phase flows has been developed elsewhere. These models address the interaction of carrier and disperse phases.
Still, it is not clear what to use for a given level of concentration, and for the objective of a given study. Furthermore, the action of turbulence needs to be quantified carefully depending on the problem at hand, and phenomena such as sediment entrainment need to be accounted for.
In this presentation, I describe a novel framework to analyze sediment transport, which clearly puts forward a pathway for the analysis of a host of problems. We present the application of this framework to solve the problem of sediment in suspension. For the case of transport of sediment as bed-load, we present a Lagrangian model which tracks each particle individually and addresses the Non-Fickian behavior of the particles; followed by a new computational algorithm for the Basset force. Finally, we describe theoretical and numerical approaches to deal with two-phase

An Illiquid Market in the Desert: The Role of Interest Groups in Shaping Environmental Regulaton

A seminar by Dr. Eric Edwards
Friday, April 22 at 3:10pm in UI Hubert room 27

ABSTRACT
We present a lobby model to explain the adoption and persistence of seemingly costly environmental  policies relative to the likely benefits generated. The arguments of the model are illustrated by water  trade restrictions for mining firms in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. The area is one of the driest  in the world but also the world’s top copper producer. Due to regulation of access to local water in  the region, firms have begun using desalinated water at a cost of up to $19,542 per m3/day while agricultural  water trades at median price of $343 per m3/day. We explore how governmental maintenance of environmental  and indigenous water supplies through restrictions on water trades causes these large price differentials.  We provide a simple framework that explains how this type of policy can be supported under reasonable  assumptions about lobbying. Interest group lobbying, limited information to unorganized general citizens  about policy costs and benefits, and their associated distribution can lead to strong regulation, even  when the protected environmental areas and agricultural populations are small and isolated. Differencein-  difference modeling of sector prices indicates that after an abrupt increase in regulatory denials,  prices diverged in a manner consistent with the lobbying model. Using market price and desalination  cost data, policy costs are estimated at $6.15 billion dollars or approximately $350 per citizen, which  may or may not equate to perceived general benefits.

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WSU Innovators on April 12th – Seattle Marriott Waterfront

  2016 LECTURE
Stormwater detox How natural infrastructure can help save salmon
When stormwater drains from roadways, parking lots, and rooftops, it carries a torrent of pollutants into local rivers and streams. The runoff is toxic enough to kill adult coho salmon in just a few hours. The problem is so vast that stormwater runoff has become the biggest source of pollution in the Puget Sound.  WSU scientist Dr. Jenifer McIntyre has discovered new ways to mitigate the lethal effects of stormwater runoff. Her lecture reveals what you and others can do to restore water quality in your community.
Reserve your seat today Reservations required by Tuesday, April 5. Hosted by your friends at WSU.  April 12, 2016  |  4:00 p.m. Seattle Marriott Waterfront 2100 Alaskan Way

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Reception to follow, 5:00 to 6:30 p.m. Gratis for our guests, the reception will feature Chateau Ste. Michelle wines, Pike Locale beers, and locally sourced fare.  Questions? Ann Goos 206-465-5136

Earth Lab is hiring 7 new Post-Doctoral Research Scholars

Earth Lab is a new initiative launched in September 2015 by the University of Colorado-Boulder as part of the campus-wide Grand Challenge effort called “Our Space. Our Future.” Earth Lab’s mission is to harness the wave of Earth observations from space and integrate them to answer outstanding questions about the pace and pattern of environmental change, from our backyards to our world.   Post-Doctoral Research Scholars: Application DEADLINE EXTENDED to February 18, 2016

SEE FULL AD HERE: http://www.colorado.edu/geography/jkbalch/jkbprofile/Earth_Lab_Jobs!.html TO APPLY, please go to the CU Careers website (www.cu.edu/careers). You can access the online application by searching for the posting # 03473, or you can go to this link directly: https://cu.taleo.net/careersection/jobdetail.ftl?job=03473&lang=en#.VqZeVJjCKRA.gmail For general inquiries regarding Earth Lab jobs, please contact Chelsea Nagy at: Rachel.Nagy@Colorado.EDU

Call for Posters: BioEarth All-Hand Meeting due Feb 12.

Climate, Land Use, Agriculture and Natural Resources:
Activities in Interdisciplinary Research, Education and Outreach 3:00-5:30pm on Thursday, Feb 25, 2016
Location: PACCAR Town Square (2001 Grimes Way)
Pullman Campus, Washington State University, Pullman, WA

Submission Details
Abstract submission deadline: Friday, February 12
E-mail abstracts to: Jacqueline McCabe, jacquem@wsu.edu
Poster Size Restrictions: horizontal dimension of 48 in

Data Flow Conference Registration is now open!

 

Monday, May 09, 2016-Tuesday, May 10, 2016
LSU Lod Cook Conference Center 3838 W Lakeshore Drive Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 70808
water.lsu.edu #dataflow16

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN!
Visit water.lsu.edu/registration/ to register for Data Flow 2016! STUDENT REGISTRATION SCHOLARSHIPS Louisiana Sea Grant is sponsoring registration scholarships for student presenters. Stay tuned for more information!
CALL FOR ABSTRACTS DEADLINE EXTENDED
The deadline for abstract submission has been extended to Monday, February 1, 2016.
Download the Call for Abstracts

 

Call for Abstracts: 2016 UCOWR/NIWR Annual Conference, June 21-23, 2016

The USGS Institute and NOAA Sea Grant Programs will be hosting a special session at the 2016 UCOWR/NIWR Annual Conference, June 21-23, 2016 at the Hilton Pensacola Beach Hotel in Pensacola Beach, Florida.

Special Session
Sea Grant College Programs and Water Resources Research Institutes: Research and Partnerships Investigating Land-Sea Interface

NOAA Sea Grant College Program (Sea Grant) and the USGS Water Resources Research Institutes (WRRI) through the National Institutes for Water Resources (NIWR) are both Federal-State partnerships federally mandated to address the Nation’s oceans, coastal, Great Lakes, and water resources issues. Sea Grant is working on integrated research, education and outreach including water issues to assist coastal communities. The Institutes focus research and student training to address water issues related to resource availability, infrastructure and ecosystem services in watersheds. These programs intersect at the land-sea interface and in some locations over entire watersheds, but no coordinated effort to explore and exploit synergistic capacity between the Federal Agencies has occurred to date. Focusing on the significant aspect of the connection between coastal waters and the fresh water inputs they receive, we welcome submissions demonstrating the intersecting foci described above and/or where Sea Grant and NIWR have partnered on research, education and/or outreach efforts.

Earl Greene, USGS, Chief of External Research, eagreene@usgs.gov
Darren Lerner, University of Hawaii, Director, Sea Grant College Program and Interim Director, Water Resources Research Center, lerner@hawaii.edu
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“‘Smart’ water markets for agriculture: Innovation on the High Plains, and prospects for Washington State” Seminar

WRC and CEREO are pleased to sponsor a seminar by Nick Brozovic and Richael Young

Wednesday, 16, December 2015
Lighty 405, 12:00pm
WSU Pullman

Nicholas Brozovic is an economist with extensive experience in water policy and management worldwide. His research focuses on using economic analysis to evaluate and design management policies for spatial, dynamic natural resource systems. Much of his work is interdisciplinary and involves collaborations with engineers, urban planners and others. He is currently working to establish functioning resource markets, such as groundwater markets, that can be used as research and teaching platforms and as models of sustainability for industry. Brozovic joined the Water for Food Institute at the University of Nebraska in July 2014. In addition to teaching, he works to ensure that the Water for Food Institute’s scientific and policy research effectively informs both policy and decision makers. Previously, Brozovic was an associate professor of agriculture and consumer economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Brozovoc holds doctoral and master’s degrees in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California-Berkley, a master’s degree in geology from the University of Southern California and a bachelor’s degree in geology from Oxford University.

Richael Young specializes in market design for the exchange of natural resource rights. As an economist, engineer, and entrepreneur, she brings together complementary skillsets for natural resources management and policy. She strives to create tailored solutions that meet local needs and economic goals. In 2014, Richael cofounded Mammoth Trading, where she serves as president. In this capacity, Richael led the development and implementation of the first smart market for groundwater in the world. Mammoth Trading’s smart markets help producers put limited water to its most productive uses, all while meeting stream flow and regulatory obligations. Richael holds a B.S. in civil and environmental engineering and an M.S. in agricultural and applied economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

2016 Annual Student Water Conference on March 24-25, 2016

About the Conference: The conference will consist entirely of student presentations to be judged by a panel of faculty members for providing constructive feedback to students in regard to their research presentation skills. Student activities will promote interaction among students of all disciplines. The conference includes two major lectures: the annual Buchanan Lecture and a Career Perceptions Lecture.

Oral Presentation Guidelines: Oral presentations will be made with PowerPoint. We will have a computer and projector for you to use. You can either bring your presentation on a flash drive or e-mail to garey.fox@okstate.edu before the conference. Please ensure that your presentation is approximately 15 minutes, which will leave 2-3 minutes for questions.

Cafe-Style Poster Presentation Guidelines: We will provide easels and poster boards (3 ft by 4 ft) for mounting your posters. You will be required to print your own posters and bring them to the conference. At the start of the session, poster presenters will give a brief, overview (maximum of 2 minutes) of their poster to the audience.

Awards will be given for outstanding student poster and oral presentations.

Abstract Submission: Apply to present at this conference by completing the abstract submission form (linked here) by January 15, 2016.

Airport Shuttle: A shuttle will be provided between the Oklahoma City Airport (Will Rogers World Airport) and Stillwater on Wednesday, March 23rd and Saturday, March 27th.
For more information about the Student Water Conference, please contact Dr. Garey Fox (garey.fox@okstate.edu).

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